choose language

english

Close

cemetery: Powązki, Warszawa
photography: Jacek Michiej
Warszawa

Cmentarz Wojskowy na Powązkach

Famous burials
gallery
Edit the description of the cemetery
add photos
A beautiful cemetery
The number of internauts who recognized this cemetery as one of the most beautiful Polish cemeteries is 0.

If you also think that it is one of the most beautiful Polish cemeteries, select the Beautiful cemetery button and cast your vote.

The ranking of Polish cemeteries according to the number of votes is presented in the section Polish cemeteries.
Check the option below if you think that this cemetery is one of the most beautiful Polish cemeteries.

Your vote will influence the position of the cemetery in the ranking of the most beautiful Polish cemeteries presented on the website.

Close

Return to the main page
Military Cemetery in Powązki, usually Powązki Wojskowe - municipal cemetery located at ul. Powązkowska 43/45 in Warsaw. The necropolis is located in the north-western part of Powązki, in the Żoliborz district. From the south it borders with Lasek on Koło, from the west on al. Armii Krajowej, and from the north, ul. Powązkowska. The cemetery covers an area of 24.3 ha. The cemetery is sometimes confused with the much older Powązkowski cemetery on the same street. [source: Wikipedia, 474387]
type of the cemeterymunicipal
state of the cemeteryactive
[source: Wikipedia, 474387]
Poland
the area where services are available
area where services are not available
History
The cemetery was founded in 1912 by the authorities of the Warsaw Military District as an Orthodox cemetery intended for dead Russian soldiers. After the outbreak of World War I, the resting place was found here not only by the Russians, but also prisoners - German, Hungarian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak and Polish soldiers who died in Warsaw hospitals . After the occupation of Warsaw by the German army in August 1915, the necropolis went under the management of the German garrison . In its north-western part, German soldiers died and died . After 1918, the cemetery was taken over by military authorities and placed under the management of the Curia of the Field Bishop . The necropolis was enlarged to 16.5 ha, divided into quarters and the main avenue was marked out . In 1922, Kuria gave direct supervision over the cemetery of the newly created parish of St. Józefat . The cemetery became a traditional place of military burials who died in time of peace and members of their families. In 1921 and in subsequent years, the participants of the uprisings: November, January, Greater Poland, Silesian uprisings, heroes of the Polish-Bolshevik war and the battles for the Polish border and the victims of the May coup were resting on it. Placing after 1937 on the wall of the veterans' house of the January Uprising 205 brown plates with names of insurgents who died in recent years in Poland was one of the first cases of symbolic grave building in the cemetery - people who died or died in other places . Such a solution was especially often practiced at the Powązki cemetery after World War II. During the defense of Warsaw in September 1939, the fallen soldiers were buried at the cemetery, often victims of air bombardments . After the capitulation of the city, the exhumed bodies of soldiers buried in the city squares and squares were moved there . In 1941, the occupation authorities began burial in the cemetery of German soldiers. The Germans occupied a five-hectare area from Powązkowska Street for this purpose, ordering an exhumation of the 59 graves of Polish soldiers there . The separated area was fenced and the main gate closed to the Polish population . During the occupation in Powązki, usually under the assumed names, members of the Polish resistance movement, among others Jan Bytnar (as Jan Domański) . Soviet POWs were also buried here . In 1945-1947, the exhumed bodies of insurgents and civilians buried in the city during the Warsaw Uprising were moved to the cemetery. In the occupying dense area of the quarters, the fallen soldiers of the Home Army were buried, including from Zośka, Parasol, Golski, Gustaw, Kiliński, Miotła, and Kryska groups and battalions, as well as soldiers of the People's Army. On August 1, 1946, on the second anniversary of the outbreak of the Uprising, a monument to Gloria Victis was unveiled in the A-26 headquarters. The majority of civilian casualties were buried on August 1945 at the eastern border of the military cemetery in the area of 7.8 hectares, the first non-denominational (communal) cemetery in Warsaw . In 1946, the cemetery was taken over by the military administration, which allowed to obtain funds for the preservation and tidying up of the necropolis . In the 1950s, the Aleja Zasłużonych Avenue was located in the cemetery, located in the part of the main avenue . It was closed with two roundabouts and planted with tujas . Its central axis is closed by the tomb of Karol Świerczewski. When there was no room for it, it was decided that its extension would be two perpendicular alleys to the main alley: * at the main gate at ul. Powązkowska, between quarters 2 and 4, * behind the tomb of Bolesław Bierut, between quarters 30 and 32, 29 and 31. On January 1, 1964, the military cemetery was connected to the municipal cemetery, and as a result, the object taken over by the city changed its name to the Communal Cemetery - Powązki . in the years 1963-1964, the Pre-Burial House was designed by Zbigniew Gnass in cooperation with Ryszard Sobolewski and Stanisław Lisowski. In the years 1965-1969 war quarters were rebuilt. In addition to the separate quarters on the cemetery, there are numerous monuments, memorials and commemorative plaques including monuments of Cichociemni, 54 members of the PPR executed on December 16, 1942, 1st Brigades of Paratroopers who died at Arnhem and prisoners of war shot in Woldenberg. In 1990, the remains of 2,566 buried in the cemetery of German soldiers who died in Warsaw hospitals from wounds on the Eastern Front and during the fights in the Warsaw Uprising were exhumed and transferred to a war cemetery near the village of Joachimów-Mogiły . In 1998, the Warsaw Council restored the name of the Military Cemetery in operation before 1964. As in the case of the remaining municipal cemeteries, families of the deceased: Order of the White Eagle, Virtuti Militari Military Order, Order of the Military Cross and Honorary Citizens of the Capital City of Warsaw. Warsaw is exempted from fees for providing a burial place at the Military Cemetery in order to create and preserve the grave and for making the niche available in the columbarium. [source: Wikipedia, 474387]
Military cemetery in Powązki
Accommodation on Łączka. In the so-called the Na Łączka quarters were buried and murdered by the Security Office in 1945-1956. This place is located near the walls between the military cemetery and non-denominational (communal) cemetery, at which UB secretly hid the murdered. On September 27, 2015, the Pantheon - the Cursed-Unbelieved Mausoleum was unveiled there. Dolinka Katyńska. Dolinka Katyńska at the Powązki Military Cemetery is the most important place in Warsaw to commemorate the victims of the Katyn massacre (1940). Accommodation Smolensk. On November 10, 2010 at the Powązki Military Cemetery a monument was unveiled in honor of the victims of the Tu-154 disaster in Smolensk, designed by Warsaw sculptor Marek Moderau and located in the so-called Smolensk quarters. An integral part of the commemoration are the graves of 28 victims of the disaster located there. Accommodation of the Scout Battalion of the Home Army Zośka. In this quarters, marked as A-20, there are 174 graves, mostly scouts - members of the Gray Ranks and the Zośka Battalion who died during World War II, and individual civilian graves. The first person buried in this place (3 April 1943) was Jan Bytnar Rudy, who was attacked on March 26 in action under the Arsenal. Upon obtaining the consent to his burial (under the assumed name of Jan Domański), the consent of the management of the necropolis to occupy the adjacent area for subsequent burials was obtained. The place was indicated by Tadeusz Zawadzki Zośka at the instigation of Józef Zawadzki's father. A characteristic feature of the quarters are white birch crosses set on graves. Perpendicular to the line of graves there is also a symbolic tomb in the form of a wall covered with black syenite. It carries dozens of names of fallen soldiers associated with Assault Groups and Zośk Battalion, who do not have their graves at Powązki (in most cases their bodies have not been found) [source: Wikipedia, 474387]
Famous burials
Aleksander Szczygło
1963-2010
Light a candle on the grave

Danuta Szaflarska
1915-2017
Light a candle on the grave

Sławomir Skrzypek
1963-2010
Light a candle on the grave

Andrzej Błasik
1962-2010
Light a candle on the grave

Grzegorz Ciechowski
1957-2001
Light a candle on the grave

Maria Czubaszek
1939-2016
Light a candle on the grave

Romuald Dębski
1956-2018
Light a candle on the grave

Lech Falandysz
1942-2003
Light a candle on the grave

Przemysław Gosiewski
1964-2010
Light a candle on the grave

Adam Hanuszkiewicz
1924-2011
Light a candle on the grave

Alina Janowska
1923-2017
Light a candle on the grave

Wojciech Jaruzelski
1923-2014
Light a candle on the grave

Jacek Kaczmarski
1957-2004
Light a candle on the grave

Zygmunt Kałużyński
1918-2004
Light a candle on the grave

Jerzy Kawalerowicz
1922-2007
Light a candle on the grave

Jan Kociniak
1937-2007
Light a candle on the grave

Leszek Kołakowski
1927-2009
Light a candle on the grave

Marek Kotański
1942-2002
Light a candle on the grave

Władysław Kowalski
1936-2017
Light a candle on the grave

Maciej Kozłowski
1957-2010
Light a candle on the grave

Jacek Kuroń
1934-2004
Light a candle on the grave

Lucjan Kydryński
1929-2006
Light a candle on the grave

Robert Leszczyński
1967-2015
Light a candle on the grave

Jan Machulski
1928-2008
Light a candle on the grave

Grzegorz Miecugow
1955-2017
Light a candle on the grave

Stanisław Mikulski
1929-2014
Light a candle on the grave

Karol Modzelewski
1937-2019
Light a candle on the grave

Jan Olszewski
1930-2019
Light a candle on the grave

Mieczysław Rakowski
1926-2008
Light a candle on the grave

Zbigniew Religa
1938-2009
Light a candle on the grave

Zbigniew Romaszewski
1940-2014
Light a candle on the grave

Olga Aleksandra Sipowicz
1951-2018
Light a candle on the grave

Kamila Skolimowska
1982-2009
Light a candle on the grave

Tomasz Stańko
1942-2018
Light a candle on the grave

Michał Sumiński
1915-2011
Light a candle on the grave

Barbara Wachowicz
1937-2018
Light a candle on the grave

Zbigniew Zapasiewicz
1934-2009
Light a candle on the grave

gallery
Wikipedia, Anna Zalewska, Flickr images reviewed by FlickreviewR 2, Jarosław Kaczyński in 2018, Jolanta Szczypińska, Marek Kuchciński, Mariusz Błaszczak in 2018, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Stanisław Karczewski (politician)
Wikipedia, Anna Zalewska, Flickr images reviewed by FlickreviewR 2, Jarosław Kaczyński in 2018, Jola
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memorials of World War II in Warsaw, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising plaques, Zośka Battalion
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memoria
Wikipedia, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Powązki Cemetery, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising plaques, Zośka Battalion
Wikipedia, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Powązki Cemetery, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising plaqu
Wikipedia, Flickr images reviewed by FlickreviewR 2, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Representative Company of the Polish Army
Wikipedia, Flickr images reviewed by FlickreviewR 2, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Representative Com
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memorials in Warsaw, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising graves
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memoria
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Miotła Battalion, Photographs taken on 2006-08-01, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising graves
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Miotła Battalion, Pho
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memorials in Warsaw, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising graves
Wikipedia, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Monuments and memoria
Wikipedia, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Self-published work
Wikipedia, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Self-published work
Wikipedia, Beata Szydło in 2016, Commemorations of 2010 Polish Air Force Tu-154 crash, Files provided by Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland, Flickr images reviewed by FlickreviewR 2, Flickr public domain images needing human review, Jarosław Kaczyński in 2016, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, P
Wikipedia, Beata Szydło in 2016, Commemorations of 2010 Polish Air Force Tu-154 crash, Files provide
Wikipedia, Cichociemni tombs, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Self-published work, Warsaw Uprising graves
Wikipedia, Cichociemni tombs, Files with no machine-readable source, Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Se
The service operator is
Respekto sp. z o.o.
ul. Letnia 16
05-510 Chyliczki
123-141-6623
+48 (22) 350 75 61
kontakt@pamietam.pl
facebook/pamietam
Transaction settlements
by payment card and e-transfer
are carried out through
dotpay.pl